Pastor Steve's Popeye Page

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The Cartoons Themselves
 

Here are all the Famous Studios' Popeye cartoons rated by me!


  

Last updated 10-23-08. 
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THE CARTOONS

For a listing of all the cartoons, click on the following list names: 
Alphabetical
By year
By category



 

Spinach Souffle' - The Best

In Alphabetic Order: 
(Cartoons appear by year in the next section.)

A Wolf In Sheik's Clothing (1948)
A Balmy Swami (1949)
Abusement Park (1947)
All's Fair At The Fair (1947)
Alpine For You (1951)
Beach Peach (1950)
Beaus Will Be Beaus  (1955)
Cartoons Ain't Human (1943)
Cops Is Tops (1956)
Farmer And The Belle (1950)
Gym Jam (1950)
Insect To Injury (1956)
Jitterbug Jive (1950)
Klondike Casanova (1946)
Lumberjack and Jill (1949)
Me Musical Nephews (1942)
Mister And Mistletoe (1955)
Olive Oyl For President (1948)
Parlez-Vous Woo (1956)
Pop-Pie Ala Mode (1945)
Popeye Meets Hercules (1948) 
Popeye And The Pirates (1947)
Pre-Hysterical Man (1948)
Private Eye Popeye (1954)
Quick On The Vigor (1950)
Ration For The Duration (1943)
Rocket To Mars (1946)
Safari So Good (1947)
Seein' Red White 'N' Blue (1943)
Shape Ahoy (1945)
Silly Hillbilly (1949)
Snow Place Like Home (1948)
Spree Lunch (1957)
Symphony In Spinach (1948)
Taxi Turvy (1954)
The Island Fling (1947) 
The Royal Four Flusher (1947)
The Fistic Mystic (1947)
Too Weak To Work (1943)
Tops In The Big Top (1945)
Tots Of Fun (1952)
Vacation With Play (1950)
We're On Our Way To Rio (1944)


 

SPINACH SOUFFLÉ - THE BEST

 


Me Musical Nephews (1942)

Yes, Popeye's nephews are annoying, but at least in this cartoon, they're SUPPOSED TO BE!! Popeye tries to put them to bed when they'd rather stay up all night playing instruments. A battle of wills ensues familiar to any parent whose children have had slumber parties. An imaginative closing scene. (For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Seein' Red White 'N' Blue (1943)

Bluto tries to dodge the draft but sees the error of his ways.  He and Popeye team up, eat spinach, and lick a nest of spies.  (For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Too Weak To Work (1943)

Bluto pretends to be sick (the slacker!) rather than work at getting our ships ready for the war. Popeye, disguised as a nurse(!), shows him the error of his ways.

Ration For The Duration (1943)

Popeye fights the beanstalk giant, who is hoarding supplies that are needed for the war effort. I love the Victory Garden that sprouts at the end of the episode.

Cartoons Ain't Human (1943)

An animated cartoon character writes and draws his own animated cartoon. When Popeye premieres his film for Olive and his nephews, the result is hilarious.

We're On Our Way To Rio (1944)

Spinach gives Popeye the power to dance the samba and win a South American Olive Oyl's heart.





Pop-Pie Ala Mode (1945)

You'll never see this film, due to its unfortunate use of derogatory racial stereotypes, which is too bad because it is as disturbing and as engrossing as any episode of X-Files or Millennium. A tribe of cannibals tries to eat Popeye.

Tops In The Big Top (1945)

Bluto frames Popeye as an alcoholic who is wrecking the circus. 




After Olive rejects the Sailor Man, 





Bluto moves in as her new partner. I like cartoons where Bluto uses some smarts and tricks Popeye and Olive more than cartoons where he just punches Popeye aside and grabs her. It shows how insidiously evil he really is. (For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Shape Ahoy (1945)



Olive Oyl washes ashore on Popeye and Bluto's island where the two "pals" promptly forgot they've sworn off women and compete to win her. Alas, she only has eyes for - Frank Sinatra!! Funny stuff.


Klondike Casanova (1946)

Fur trader Bluto falls for saloon singer Olive Oyl,













much to Popeye's chagrin. 


(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Rocket To Mars (1946)

Imaginative, humorous, and even scary sci-fi cartoon with Popeye on the red planet, battling aliens who want to take over Earth.

The Fistic Mystic (1947)

Olive swoons over a swami who uses magic to try to get Popeye out of the way.







The Island Fling (1947)

Another cartoon with racial stereotypes, but aside from that, a good spoof of island romance fantasies as a girl-happy Robinson Crusoe decides castaway Olive is just the full course meal he needs. Popeye cheerfully overcomes ever increasing obstacles designed to get rid of him.










(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Abusement Park (1947)

Bluto tries to steal Olive away from Popeye at an amusement park. I hope the park's owners had a lot of insurance!!




(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Popeye And The Pirates (1947)

Olive thinks pirates are exciting and romantic and, wouldn't you know it, a ship flying the Jolly Roger appears and its captain is more than anxious to add her to his spoils. Then Popeye shows up as a femme fatale!!!???!!!




(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

The Royal Four Flusher (1947)

The plot of this cartoon is classic Famous Studios. In fact, it's what most people think the majority of their cartoons were like. Bluto charms Olive, 





dispatches Popeye,




gets Olive alone in his penthouse, 





traps her in a straight jacket (?!?!?!),




and moves in for a kiss. Olive screams, Popeye eats his spinach, and Bluto is history. 





(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Safari So Good (1947)

"Me, Tarzan. You, Olive Oyl." That about sums it up. Popeye trounces herds of wild animals in ways that would give PETA nightmares, but they are funny.



All's Fair At The Fair (1947)

A hot air balloonist wants to take Olive for a ride.  Luckily for Popeye, there's a spinach canning exhibit at the fair, just as there undoubtedly are at the county fairs you've attended.



Olive Oyl For President (1948)

A look inside Olive Oyl's mind as she sings a catchy song about what she'd do if elected. 











A top-notch musical cartoon.  Maybe Elizabeth Dole could pick up some pointers.



Pre-Hysterical Man (1948)



Olive falls into a valley that time forgot 







and is rescued by a caveman who wants her as his mate. 




(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Popeye Meets Hercules (1948)

The ancient Greek gods look on as Hercules makes a play for the smitten Olive









and Popeye attempts to win her back by besting the mythological figure in feats of strength.  Popeye actually prays in this cartoon (albeit to the goddess of spinach)!!! 






(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

A Wolf In Sheik's Clothing (1948)

 In the Middle East (where it is so hot that Popeye's shadow uses an umbrella to shade itself), 





Olive fantasizes about being romanced by a sheik. 





Unfortunately for Popeye, she meets one who is extremely willing to oblige. 












(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Snow Place Like Home (1948)

A tornado whisks Popeye and Olive up off a beach 





and deposits them in the Arctic Circle 







where a hot-blooded French trading post keeper saves Olive from freezing to death and proceeds to try to warm things up with her even more.






(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Symphony In Spinach (1948)

Maestro Bluto uses music to woo Olive when he and Popeye compete for a job in her band. 

















(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Lumberjack and Jill (1949)


Olive Oyl arrives as the new cook at Popeye and Bluto's logging camp 







and Bluto wastes no time in trying to get his "partner" out of the way.



A Balmy Swami (1949)

A stage magician entrances Olive 





and when Popeye interferes with the trick, the sleepwalking Ms. Oyl strolls into danger at a nearby construction site.





Silly Hillbilly (1949)

Traveling salesman Popeye brings all sorts of "new fangled, modern convenience gadgets" to hillbillies Bluto and Olive Oyl. 










(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Gym Jam (1950)

Bluto disguises himself as a woman to join a class at Popeye's gym and get close to Olive. 





Popeye had better get his one remaining eye examined - Fast!!!!  The only way he could fall for this trick is if he was going blind. 





(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Beach Peach (1950)



A lifeguard notices Olive in her bikini, 













and Popeye's suddenly in deep trouble.



 (For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Jitterbug Jive (1950)

Old-fashioned Popeye annoys Olive, 









who wants her party to be a swinging affair, and hep cat Bluto arrives, who wants to smooch with his hostess. 






(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Quick On The Vigor (1950)

At a fair/amusement park, Olive throws Popeye over for Bluto the strongman. 







But when Bluto wants "a little kiss" at the top of the ferris wheel, suddenly it's, "Help, Popeye, Help!"





Olive is not exactly known for her fidelity. (For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Farmer And The Belle (1950)

Popeye and Bluto compete for a job on Olive Oyl's farm. 







Popeye wins, 





but Bluto is a poor loser (imagine that!).



Vacation With Play (1950)



At a summer resort, Popeye tries to keep Olive Oyl and the athletics instructor from getting physical with each other.







(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Alpine For You (1951)

Popeye and Olive go mountain climbing 







but guide Bluto wants to steer Olive to a place where they can be alone.



Tots Of Fun (1952)

Popeye's nephews cause havoc while "helping" their uncle build a house.  They synchronize their antics to music on their record player.

Taxi Turvy (1954)

 Popeye and Bluto compete, not for Olive's heart, but for her business as they portray rival cab drivers.  Bluto finally wises up and snatches the spinach away from Popeye as he's about to eat it.  (Don't worry.  It all turns out okay.)

Private Eye Popeye (1954)

 Popeye pursues a jewel thief around the world in a cartoon very reminiscent of Tex Avery's Droopy films.





Beaus Will Be Beaus (1955)

Bluto repeatedly tricks Popeye into breaking his promise to Olive at the beach. 









It looks as if Bluto has finally won Olive 





- until Popeye plays a trick of his own. 





(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Mister And Mistletoe (1955)

Bluto pretends to be Santa Claus in order to spend Christmas Eve snuggling with Olive Oyl. 







(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Cops Is Tops (1956)

Popeye's afraid that policewoman Olive is in over her head, so he sneaks along on her beat.







 Both characters have their eyes opened to the assets of the other. 











(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Insect To Injury (1956)

A swarm of termites tries to munch down on Popeye's house, leading to a battle of wits worthy of Warner Brother's classic Looney Tunes.





Parlez-Vous Woo (1956)



Bluto disguises himself as Olive's favorite TV star. 





The Famous Studios' revamp of Olive Oyl's looks reaches its zenith in this cartoon. 





(For a further review of this cartoon, click on the name.)

Spree Lunch (1957)

Popeye and Bluto are rival diner owners competing for Wimpy's business.  Wimpy, of course, milks the situation for all it's worth and winds up with all the free food he can handle.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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